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Women in Law

December issue of without prejudice magazine

Finding new ways for women 2016 The conversation continues. There are numerous matters to deal with and develop, amongst them: whether law serves the purposes it sets out to achieve and whether the processes are effective; whether the adversarial system of law is ideal and sustainable ; whether there is sufficient focus on the “humanising” issues of legal education and how to bring “conscious” lawyering into the curriculums and the profession; and of course, the role of women in achieving and enhancing these ideals. Read...

Franchising Law

May 2016 issue of Lawyer Monthly

In an era of global business expansion, franchising has seen a significant increase on the back of business convenience, the likelihood for success with a franchise, and the ease in training and financing the business. However, with an increase in franchising comes a dynamic legal field for this business model and its potential risks. Here, Lawyer Monthly talks to Graeme Wilson, the Founder and CEO of Whipping the Cat, a South Africa-based legal consultancy offering businesses of all sizes an alternative to traditional law firms. Read...

Africa Special Report

November 2015 issue of Lawyer Monthly

Beginning our Africa Special Report this month, Lawyer Monthly takes a look at the economic and legal issues that abound in South Africa. To this end we speak to Graeme Wilson, the founder and CEO of Whipping the Cat (www.whippingthecat.com), a South Africa-based legal consultancy offering businesses of all sizes an alternative to traditional law firms. Read...

Encouraging women to find new ways to lead in law

Article written by Niki Malherbe in Bizcommunity Online Publication

Convened by the UCT Law @ work Professional Development Project and the Centre for Integrative Law, the recent summit entitled, ‘Finding New Ways for Women to Lead in Law’, evidenced that the old traditional way of practicing law is undergoing an exciting transformation. Companies with names such as Whipping the Cat and Cognia Law were among the sponsors at the event, which was attended by more than 100 women delegates. The concept of new law is undoubtedly gaining momentum, as young lawyers take up the challenge to find new ways of leading in law. Along with a noticeably greater number of women lawyers entering the profession, there appears to be a simultaneous emergence of a more conscious, more purposeful approach to spending a life in law, which underpins the new young lawyer. The summit was initiated and conceptualised by Amanda Lamond, Director of the Centre for Integrative Law, who noted the increase of women in the legal profession, and raised the question of whether the legal profession would be transformed by the women who practice law. In an emotional sharing of inspiring stories of the various journeys of women in their legal careers, from high-powered professionals and practicing lawyers...

Working for you

September 2015 issue of Destiny Magazine

The many complexities that come with running a business often necessitate logistical support. We highlight companies that provide transport, legal and financial resources and services for entrepreneurs. Read...

On the right side of labour law

May 2015 edition of Entrepreneur Magazine

All employees have basic rights in the workplace and it’s the employer’s responsibility to toe the legal line. AS SMEs GROW, one area they tend to neglect is employees’ rights. Graeme Wilson, founder of innovative SME-focused legal firm, Whipping the Cat, says there are four key questions you should be asking to ensure you are a responsible employer. Read...

Entrepreneurs wil fokus op kliënte

Sake NUUS

En staat moet asseblief sy kant bring… Dis entrepreneurs wat die voetwerk doen vir ware werkskepping. Francois Williams het ’n paar entrepreneurs en sakelui met wie Die Burger die afgelope jaar of wat onderhoude gevoer het, uitgevra oor die lesse wat hulle in 2014 geleer het en hul verwagtinge vir...

Why SMES don’t use lawyers

MyNews24 is a user-generated section of News24.com

RATHER HAVE A FENCE AT THE TOP OF THE HILL THAN AN AMBULANCE AT THE BOTTOM: WHY SMES DON’T USE LAWYERS (AND WHY THEY SHOULD) Small and medium-sized businesses typically encounter similar commercial law dilemmas. Graeme Wilson, founder and CEO of boutique commercial law consultancy, Whipping the Cat, believes that there is an opportunity to demystify law and make legal services more accessible to a wider range of companies. Below he outlines the four most common legal obstacles encountered by SMEs when “dealing with lawyers”, and some real-life solutions, which the Whipping the Cat legal advisory team has developed over the last year for its clients. 1. Lawyers are expensive. There is a perception that lawyers are expensive. This may be true in several circumstances, but I am aware of several lawyers who offer really good value for money. I think that the reality is rather that companies do not know what costs to expect when they engage a lawyer. Most lawyers will tell you their hourly rate; some may even give an estimate of the time they will spend and give you a “ballpark” figure to budget for. But, almost without exception, traditional law firms reward their staff...

Innovative approach to taking on the old guard

Article in Business Law & Tax Review Supplement of Business Day

What is happening in the legal service world? Law firms with names like Bell, Dewar and Hall, John & Kernick and Findlay and Tait used to be everywhere. Now they don’t even exist. Instead we hear names like Caveat Legal, Cognia Law and even Whipping the Cat. Those in the know talk about LPO, ABS, Non-traditional lawyers and NewLaw. So what has changed and what changes are there likely to be in the legal service industry in 2014 and beyond? Let’s start at the top with the big players, the legal giants of the world and of South Africa. In the last few years Deneys Reitz merged with global firm Norton Rose (which merged again to create Norton Rose Fulbright), Webber Wentzel formed an alliance with powerhouse, Linklaters, Baker McKenzie picked up the team from Dewey Leboeuf and launched in Johannesburg, Routlege-Modise first merged with Eversheds and more recently with Hogan Lovells. Eversheds then tied up with Mahons Attorneys. Perhaps it’s all a bit confusing, but the big picture is clear – the global legal firms have arrived in South Africa in a big way. This trend is set to continue in 2014 with more international law firms either...

NEWLAW is here

Article in BizNis Africa and Polity Online Publications

There has been much merger activity amongst the legal giants of the world and it is no exception in South Africa where the legal market has become increasingly competitive. With firms such as Bell, Dewar and Hall, John & Kernick and Findlay and Tait, who all used to be well-known in legal circles, no longer existing and Deneys Reitz merging with global firm Norton Rose, which then merged again to create Norton Rose Fulbright, Webber Wentzel forming an alliance with magic circle firm, Linklaters, Baker McKenzie taking over the team from Dewey Leboeuf and launching in Johannesburg, Routlege-Modise first merging with Eversheds and then more recently with Hogan Lovells and Eversheds tying up with Mahons Attorneys, it is fair to say that the large law firm market is becoming decidedly crowded. BigLaw has long established itself in South Africa and it is expected that this will continue in 2014 with more international law firms either setting up their own offices or merging with local firms. This is especially true for those firms wanting to access new markets in Africa but not having the local know-how and therefore needing to merge with established firms on the continent. The result is...