The Entreprenurial Edge

CNBC Africa

A Succinct Guide To COVID-19 Business Funding And Relief

Article from Heavy Chef Publication

Daily, news reports flow in about how businesses the world over are either taking serious strain or shutting down altogether due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s becoming increasingly imperative for business owners to put their heads down and think of strategies for staying afloat in these uncertain times.   For some businesses, thinking out of the box and pivoting their business idea is hardly an option. For others, it may be an option but the capital required to do so is a nonentity. And then there are those businesses that don’t have the funds it takes to even carry on operating, much less make changes to their business model. The life of an entrepreneur is generally stressful but more so now that ever.  So what options are out there for businesses that need funding to keep their businesses running? Our valued partner Whipping the Cat has come up with a concise, super list of where and how to access business funding and relief in South Africa right now that we are certain you will find useful. Read...

Everything You Need To Know About Time Away From Work During The Lockdown

Article written by Graeme Wilson in Heavy Chef Publication

Going through something like what we’re going through now is especially hard to do when you don’t have all the facts. The coronavirus pandemic and the resulting nationwide lockdown has left a lot of businesses in duress, with many wondering what the lockdown actually entails and how it will impact their work processes. In this regard, Whipping the Cat has been working with quite a few clients to try and make sense of the implications of the lockdown. An area that seems to be of common concern and confusion is how to treat employee “leave” during the lockdown period.  There seems to be some confusion about the circumstances in which an employer must continue to pay their employees. This article sets out our current understanding in regard to the application of “leave”. As it stands, according to the regulation surrounding the operation of businesses during the lockdown: Certain businesses that provide essential goods or services are permitted to stay open during the lockdown period. Companies that are able to continue their operations remotely have been encouraged by the President to do so.Many companies are required to close and so many employees are not permitted (or able) to go to work...

#SALockdown 101: What The Countrywide Lockdown Actually Entails

Article from Heavy Chef Publication

The situation is real people. We are wading in deep waters in so far as the COVID-19 pandemic is concerned and there doesn’t seem to be any solution to the crisis except one: social distancing and isolation. The World Health Organisation knows this, and the South African government knows this.  This is what makes the country-wide 21-day lockdown so imperative. There is simply no way to beat this pandemic except to slow down the rate of infection because once it shoots through the proverbial roof, we are in deep trouble. An overburdened healthcare system is one sure way to lose this battle, as we have seen in the terrifying case study that is Italy.  Why then are we still seeing so many people on the streets? Why do some of us insist on carrying on as though everything is still as it were? It can’t be because we don’t care about our health and that of those around us. We refuse to believe this level of callousness. What we think is that maybe, just maybe, people don’t have enough information on what the lockdown actually entails.  So we took it upon ourselves, with the help of our partner Whipping...

Work And The COVID-19 Crisis: The Legal Implications

Article written by Graeme Wilson in Heavy Chef Publication

Business, and life as we know it, has been strongly altered over the last couple of months. Quite unexpectedly, the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the way in which we go about our daily business, and sadly it appears like this is not going to change in the near future. While it is no longer business as usual, in a sense it has to be. Only if we focus on keeping our livelihood and that of the people we work with intact can we truly contribute to a situation that is feeling more and more hopeless as news of the impact COVID-19 is having on lives and commerce across the world reaches us. At the very least, we have the obligation to try our best to keep things running so that once we’ve beaten this virus, we have something left to go back to. Needless to say, there are many questions that business owners have about what the legal implications of coronavirus are, especially with regard to non-performance of contracts and the well-being of staff. Lucky for us, we have Whipping The Cat – one of Heavy Chef’s partners and a respected name in the legal game – on hand...

Law firm bucks trend by offering clients fixed fee legal services

Article from Cape Talk

A local law firm is bucking the trend in the way it charges clients for legal services. Whipping the Cat aims to differentiate themselves by charging clients based on a fixed-fee, rather than a traditional hourly-rate. CEO and Founder Grame Wilson spoke to CapeTalk’s Kieno Kammies about their business model. The differentiating factor from other law firms is that right from the onset we decided to throw the hourly clock out the window and not charge people an hourly rate for legal services. Everything that we do is on a fixed fee basis. — Grame Wilson, CEO and Founder of Whipping the Cat Before we do anything we do a proper scope of what is needed and we give our client a price for that piece of work which is fixed. — Grame Wilson, CEO and Founder of Whipping the Cat Read...

Making way for NewLaw in Africa

Article from Africa Legal

South African Graeme Wilson, founder and chief executive of Whipping the Cat, has done that by creating a new formula for offering legal services that seems more tailored to Africa’s entrepreneurial needs than the established way of doing things. It was inevitable! Sooner or later a tech-savvy, business-minded lawyer would see the potential of marrying the services he offered with the digital world and open a firm that would become a major “disruptor” of the tried and tested. South African Graeme Wilson, founder and chief executive of Whipping the Cat, has done that by creating a new formula for offering legal services that seems more tailored to Africa’s entrepreneurial needs than the established way of doing things. Wilson is based in Cape Town where he manages a tight team of digitally-skilled lawyers who use tools to complement their legal know-how. He is what is being described in the legal world as a purveyor of NewLaw. The Canadian legal market analyst Jordan Furlong described this as: “Any model, process, or tool that represents a significantly different approach to the creation or provision of legal services than what the legal profession traditionally has employed.” One of the key ways Wilson is...

Young Lawyers Should Not Fear Technology

Article written by Graeme Wilson in Heavy Chef Publication

We speak to the CEO of Heavy Chef’s legal partner Whipping The Cat, Graeme Wilson. 2017 has been a big year for Graeme, with significant growth, client acquisition and multiple prestigious awards under his belt. The legal profession is changing rapidly, so we reached out to Graeme to find out how one of the oldest, most venerable professions is being disrupted.  Graeme, in light of Heavy Chef’s seminal Blockchain event earlier this year, where Simon Dingle was quoted as saying “if you know anyone studying law, tell them to get a side-project in computer science” – what is your view on the future of legal services? Do you believe the profession is seeing a sea-change over the next decade?   In 2008 Prof. Richard Susskind published the book “The End of Lawyers”. It’s core message to lawyers was “re-skill or die”. The book received widespread acclaim. It also received its fair share of criticism from sceptics and naysayers. They claimed that the legal profession is a necessary specialist service that has survived in current form for centuries and that lawyers possess unique skills needed to analyze, interpret and advise based on a multiplicity of data and information sources.  That...

Artificial Intelligence Is Now Disrupting The Legal Services Industry

Article written by Graeme Wilson in Heavy Chef Publication

What is going ON in the legal service world? Law firms with names like Bell, Dewar and Hall, John & Kernick and Findlay and Tait used to be all over the place. Now they don’t even exist. Instead we hear names like Caveat Legal, Cognia Law and even Whipping The Cat. Those in the know talk about LPO, ABS, non-traditional lawyers and NewLaw.  Most recently the buzz is all about AI. So what has changed – and what changes are there likely to be in the legal service industry in 2018 and beyond? Let’s start at the top with the big players, the legal giants of the world and of South Africa. In the last few years Deneys Reitz merged with global firm Norton Rose (which merged again to create Norton Rose Fulbright), Webber Wentzel formed an alliance with powerhouse Linklaters, Baker McKenzie picked up the team from Dewey Leboeuf and launched in Johannesburg, Routlege-Modise first merged with Eversheds and more recently with Hogan Lovells. Eversheds then tied up with Mahons Attorneys. ENS and Bowmans elected to stay “independent” and embarked on an acquisition trail of their own elsewhere on the continent. Whichever way you look at it, the picture...

African Legal Awards African Law Firm of the Year – Small Practice: Whipping the Cat

Article from Legal Week

Whipping the Cat founder Graeme Wilson, with Legal Week’s Natalie Hill Finalists: AB & David (Highly Commended); Couto, Graça e Associados; GLA – Gabinete Legal Angola; Ngassam, Fansi & Mouafo Avocats Associes; TTA – Sociedade de Advogados. South Africa’s intriguingly named Whipping the Cat landed the African Small Practice Law Firm of the Year award for its efforts to provide an alternative legal service to small and medium-sized businesses. Through its use of technology, Whipping the Cat (a reference to 18th century British tailors who learned their skills on Savile Row before turning their back on the establishment and doing things their own way) is able to offer clients its services at a low pre-determined fixed cost, often through its monthly retainer facility. Since its launch in 2013, the firm has seen double-digit growth from retainer clients, including burger giant McDonald’s. Fee income increased 45% in the 12 months to February 2017, with year-to-date fee income up 21% compared to the same period last year. Much of that has been driven by growth in mid-size deals and M&A transactions, such as helping fintech startup ThisIsMe raise funds from private equity investors, and advising South African IT service provider IEIT...